What font to use and why:

Its a constant battle as a designer to not only stay current and maintain style that is appropriate to the current trends but also create something timeless that a client can use without the thought of needing an upgrade to their branding in 6 months. I came across an article that really captures the essence behind the thought process. I liked some of the author’s key points below:

Rule 7:  Thou shall not choose the latest cool typeface for every new project you work on

Commentary As designers, we’re all susceptible to a bit of typeface mania every now and again. You know how it is—a MyFonts newsletter arrives in your Inbox, you scroll down, and there it is. You think, “My God! That font is amazing. I must buy it and use it on the project I’m just about to start.” But hold on just a second. It might be a great typeface that you can’t live without, but is it truly right for the project? More to the point, will your client respond well to it? For example, if you’re working on a new logo for a mortician, MetroScript might not be a good font choice, no matter how much you like it. Likewise, Futura might not be ideal for the badge of the local amateur baseball team’s uniform, unless of course they all work together at an interior design store and are in to 1920s European architecture. These are extreme examples of course, but think carefully about the appropriateness of your font choices, and try not to get carried away by your own personal favorites when a tried and trusted font might serve you better.

Rule 8: Thou shall learn that trendy typefaces do not always prevail

Commentary Life is full of regrets and errors. Why did I say yes to that last cocktail? Perhaps the adoption of 12 children was overkill? Trendy typography is one of the most egregious of these errors. Curlz may seem “wacky” and “fun,” but it will ruin your life. As designers, we have the pressure of remaining aware of shifts in popular culture. Understanding what is trendy is part of the job. The obvious reason for choosing classic over trendy typefaces is that the trendy fonts will soon be out of style. Classic fonts have survived the test of time. Consider your haircut in high school. Is that school photo one that you use as your headshot for publications? No. Each of us, at one point, has fallen into a trendy and tragic hairstyle. Trendy type is the same. Template Gothic was groundbreaking in 1990. Four years later, all of these projects were dismissed as, “So 1990.” These projects now sit unseen in designers’ flat files, like a high school senior photo, hidden from public view. SA

This was originally posted at : http://www.peachpit.com

Check out the article, some of the points made are quite insightful!

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